Massachusetts Delegation

This is one of the 45 delegations in the convention, accounting for 16 of 449 people who took part.

Members (16):

Name Visualize Details Delegations
Charles F. Adams Visualize (August 18, 1807 — November 21, 1886) Charles Francis Adams, (son of John Quincy Adams, grandson of John Adams), a Representative from Massachusetts; born in Boston, Mass., August 18, 1807; spent several years with his parents in St. Petersburg, Russia; attended the Boston Latin School, and was graduated from Harvard University in 1825; studied law; was admitted to the bar on January 6, 1829, and commenced practice in Boston; member of the Massachusetts house of representatives 1841-1843; member of the Massachusetts state senate 1844-1845; founded the newspaper Boston Whig in 1846; unsuccessful candidate of the Free-Soil Party for Vice President of the United States in 1848; elected as a Republican to the Thirty-sixth and Thirty-seventh Congresses and served from March 4, 1859, to May 1, 1861, when he resigned to accept a diplomatic position; chairman, Committee on Manufactures (Thirty-sixth Congress); appointed by President Lincoln as Minister to England and served from March 20, 1861, to May 13, 1868; declined the presidency of Harvard University but became one of its overseers in 1869; died in Boston, Mass., November 21, 1886; interment in Mount Wollaston Cemetery, Quincy, Norfolk County, Mass. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/A000032] Massachusetts Delegation (This negotiation)
John B. Alley Visualize (7 January, 1817 -- 19 January, 1896) Alley was an American shoemaker, businessman, and politician. Born in Lynn, Essex County, Mass., Alley was at the age of fourteen apprenticed as a shoemaker, however, he was released at nineteen. In 1838, Alley entered the shoe manufacturing business. Alley was a member of the State senate in 1852 and was elected as a Republican to the Thirty-sixth and to the three succeeding Congresses. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774- Present', available at http://bioguide.congress.gov/biosearch/biosearch.asp] Massachusetts Delegation (United States Thirteenth Amendment 1863-65) , Massachusetts Delegation (This negotiation) , Massachusetts Delegation (United States Fourteenth Amendment & The Civil Rights Act of 1866)
Goldsmith F. Bailey Visualize (July 17, 1823 — May 8, 1862) Goldsmith Fox Bailey, a Representative from Massachusetts; born in Westmoreland, Cheshire County, N.H., July 17, 1823; attended the public schools of Fitchburg, Mass.; editor and publisher of the Bellows Falls (Vt.) Gazette in 1844; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1848 and commenced practice in Fitchburg, Mass.; served on the school committee 1849-1854; appointed postmaster of Fitchburg on May 3, 1851 and served until May 4, 1853, when his successor was appointed; member of the State house of representatives in 1857; served in the State senate 1858-1860; elected as a Republican to the Thirty-seventh Congress and served from March 4, 1861, until his death in Fitchburg, Worcester County, Mass., May 8, 1862; interment in Laurel Hill Cemetery. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/B000038] Massachusetts Delegation (This negotiation)
James Buffinton Visualize (March 16, 1817 — March 7, 1875) James Buffinton, a Representative from Massachusetts; born in Fall River, Mass., March 16, 1817; attended the common schools, and Friends College, Providence, R.I.; studied medicine but never practiced; engaged in mercantile pursuits in Fall River; mayor of Fall River in 1854 and 1855; elected as a candidate of the American Party to the Thirty-fourth Congress and as a Republican to the three succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1855-March 3, 1863); chairman, Committee on Accounts (Thirty-seventh Congress), Committee on Military Affairs (Thirty-seventh Congress); was not a candidate for renomination in 1862; was mustered into the service April 24, 1861, and was discharged June 15, 1861; special agent of the United States Treasury and internal revenue collector for the district of Massachusetts 1867-1869; elected as a Republican to the Forty-first and to the three succeeding Congresses and served from March 4, 1869, until his death in Fall River, Mass., March 7, 1875; chairman, Committee on Accounts (Forty-second and Forty-third Congresses); interment in Oak Grove Cemetery. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/B001040] Massachusetts Delegation (This negotiation)
Anson Burlingame Visualize (November 14, 1820 — February 23, 1870) Anson Burlingame, a Representative from Massachusetts; born in New Berlin, N.Y., November 14, 1820; moved with his parents to Seneca County, Ohio, in 1823, and to Detroit, Mich., in 1833; attended private schools and the Detroit branch of the University of Michigan; was graduated from the law department of Harvard University in 1846; was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Boston; served in the State senate in 1852; member of the Massachusetts constitutional convention in 1853; elected as a candidate of the American Party to the Thirty-fourth Congress and as a Republican to the Thirty-fifth and Thirty-sixth Congresses (March 4, 1855-March 3, 1861); unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1860 to the Thirty-seventh Congress; appointed Minister to Austria March 22, 1861, but was not accepted by the Austrian Government because of certain opinions he was known to entertain regarding Hungary and Sardinia; Minister to China from June 14, 1861, to November 21, 1867; appointed December 1, 1867, by the Chinese Government its ambassador to negotiate treaties with foreign powers; died in St. Petersburg, Russia, February 23, 1870; interment in Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Mass. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/B001112] Massachusetts Delegation (This negotiation)
Henry L. Dawes Visualize (30 October, 1816 -- 5 February, 1903) Dawes was an American lawyer and politician. Born in Cummington, Mass., Dawes studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1842. Dawes was a member of the State house of representatives (1848-1849, 1852), the State senate (1850), and the State constitutional convention (1853). Dawes was elected to the Thirty-fifth and to the eight succeeding Congresses and was then elected as a Republican to the United States Senate in 1875; he was reelected in 1881 and again in 1887 serving from March 4th, 1875 to March 3rd, 1893. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774- Present', available at http://bioguide.congress.gov/biosearch/biosearch.asp] Massachusetts Delegation (United States Thirteenth Amendment 1863-65) , Massachusetts Delegation (United States Fifteenth Amendment) , Massachusetts Delegation (This negotiation) , Massachusetts Delegation (United States Fourteenth Amendment & The Civil Rights Act of 1866) , Massachusetts Delegation (United States Nineteenth Amendment and Edmunds Tucker Act)
Charles Delano Visualize (June 24, 1820 — January 23, 1883) Charles Delano, a Representative from Massachusetts; born in New Braintree, Worcester County, Mass., June 24, 1820; moved with his parents to Amherst, Mass., in 1833; attended the common schools and was graduated from Amherst College, Amherst, Mass., in 1840; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1842 and commenced practice in Amherst, Mass.; moved to Northampton, Mass., in 1848 and continued the practice of law; treasurer of Hampshire County 1849-1858; elected as a Republican to the Thirty-sixth and Thirty-seventh Congresses (March 4, 1859-March 3, 1863); was not a candidate for renomination in 1862; resumed the practice of law; trustee of the Clarke School for the Education of the Deaf 1877-1883; appointed by Governor Rice in 1878 to act as special counsel for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in matters relating to the Hoosac Tunnel and the Troy & Greenfield Railroad, and served in this capacity until his death in Northampton, Mass., January 23, 1883; interment in Bridge Street Cemetery. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/D000213] Massachusetts Delegation (This negotiation)
Thomas D. Eliot Visualize (20 March, 1808 -- 14 June, 1870) Eliot was an American lawyer and politician. Born in Boston, Mass., Eliot studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1831. Eliot was elected as a Whig to the Thirty-third Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Zeno Scudder and served from April 17th, 1854 to March 3rd, 1855. Later, after declining various opportunities for candidacy, Eliot was elected as a Republican to the Thirty-sixth and to the four succeeding Congresses. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774- Present', available at http://bioguide.congress.gov/biosearch/biosearch.asp] Massachusetts Delegation (United States Thirteenth Amendment 1863-65) , Massachusetts Delegation (United States Fifteenth Amendment) , Massachusetts Delegation (This negotiation) , Massachusetts Delegation (United States Fourteenth Amendment & The Civil Rights Act of 1866)
Daniel W. Gooch Visualize (8 January, 1820 -- 11 November, 1891) Gooch was an American lawyer and politician. Born in York County, Maine, Gooch studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1846, commencing practice in Boston. Gooch was a member of the State house of representatives (1852), the State constitutional convention (1853), and was later elected as a Republican to the Thirty-fifth Congress to fill the vacancy created by the resignation of Nathaniel P. Banks. Gooch was reelected to the four succeeding Congresses and served from January 21st, 1858 to September 1st, 1865. Gooch was later elected to the Forty-third Congress, however, he did not win any subsequent reelection bid. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774- Present', available at http://bioguide.congress.gov/biosearch/biosearch.asp] Massachusetts Delegation (United States Thirteenth Amendment 1863-65) , Massachusetts Delegation (This negotiation) , Massachusetts Delegation (United States Fourteenth Amendment & The Civil Rights Act of 1866)
Samuel Hooper Visualize (3 February, 1808 -- 14 February, 1875) Hooper was an American businessman and politician. Born in Marblehead, Mass., Hooper traveled extensively until 1832, when Hooper engaged in business in Boston. Hooper was a member of the State house of representatives (1851-1853) and the State senate (1858). Hooper was elected as a Republican to the Thirty-seventh Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of William Appleton and was subsequently reelected to the Thirty-eighth and to the five succeeding Congresses serving from December 2nd, 1861 until his death. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774- Present', available at http://bioguide.congress.gov/biosearch/biosearch.asp] Massachusetts Delegation (United States Thirteenth Amendment 1863-65) , Massachusetts Delegation (United States Fifteenth Amendment) , Massachusetts Delegation (This negotiation) , Massachusetts Delegation (United States Fourteenth Amendment & The Civil Rights Act of 1866)
Alexander H. Rice Visualize (30 August, 1818 -- 22 July, 1895) Rice was an American paper manufacturer and politician. Born in Newton Lower Falls, Mass., Rice worked in the paper business until elected as mayor in 1856 and 1857. Rice was elected as a Republican to the Thirty-sixth and to the three succeeding Congresses. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774- Present', available at http://bioguide.congress.gov/biosearch/biosearch.asp] Massachusetts Delegation (United States Thirteenth Amendment 1863-65) , Massachusetts Delegation (This negotiation) , Massachusetts Delegation (United States Fourteenth Amendment & The Civil Rights Act of 1866)
Charles Sumner Visualize (6 January, 1811 -- 13 March, 1874) Sumner was an American lawyer and politician. Born in Boston, Mass., Sumner studied at Harvard Law and was admitted to the bar in 1834. Sumner was one of the founders of the Free Soil party (1848) and was elected to the United States Senate in 1851 as a Free Soiler, reelected as a Republican in 1857, 1863, and 1869 and served from April 24th, 1851 until his death. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774- Present', available at http://bioguide.congress.gov/biosearch/biosearch.asp] Massachusetts Delegation (United States Thirteenth Amendment 1863-65) , Massachusetts Delegation (United States Fifteenth Amendment) , Massachusetts Delegation (This negotiation) , Massachusetts Delegation (United States Fourteenth Amendment & The Civil Rights Act of 1866)
Eli Thayer Visualize (June 11, 1819 — April 15, 1899) Eli Thayer, (father of John Alden Thayer), a Representative from Massachusetts; born in Mendon, Worcester County, Mass., June 11, 1819; attended the common schools, the academies in Bellingham and Amherst, Mass., and the Worcester Manual Labor School; taught school in Douglas, Mass., in 1835 and 1836 and in Hopkington, R.I., in 1842; had charge of the boys' high school in Providence, R.I., in 1844; was graduated from Brown University at Providence in 1845 and was an instructor in Worcester Academy 1845-1848; studied law and was admitted to the bar, but did not practice; founded the Oread Collegiate Institute, a school for young women, in 1848; member of the Worcester School Board in 1852; alderman of Worcester in 1852 and 1853; member of the State house of representatives in 1853 and 1854; while in the legislature secured a charter, and originated and organized the New England Emigrant Aid Co., which had for its purpose the sending out of an advance colony of antislavery settlers to Kansas; elected as a Republican to the Thirty-fifth and Thirty-sixth Congresses (March 4, 1857-March 3, 1861); chairman, Committee on Public Lands (Thirty-sixth Congress); unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1860 to the Thirty-seventh Congress; delegate accredited from Oregon to the Republican National Convention in 1860; engaged in railroad and other business pursuits; unsuccessful candidate for election in 1872 to the Forty-third Congress; died in Worcester, Mass., April 15, 1899; interment in Hope Cemetery. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/T000145] Massachusetts Delegation (This negotiation)
Benjamin F. Thomas Visualize (February 12, 1813 — September 27, 1878) Benjamin Franklin Thomas, a Representative from Massachusetts; born in Boston, Mass., February 12, 1813; moved with his parents to Worcester in 1819; attended Lancaster Academy, and was graduated from Brown University, Providence, R.I., in 1830; studied law in Cambridge, Mass.; was admitted to the bar in 1833 and commenced practice in Worcester, Mass.; held several local offices; member of the State house of representatives in 1842; commissioner of bankruptcy in 1842; judge of probate 1844-1848; presidential elector on the Whig ticket in 1848; judge of the Massachusetts Supreme Court from 1853 to 1859, when he resigned; continued the practice of law in Boston, Mass.; elected as a Unionist to the Thirty-seventh Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Charles F. Adams and served from June 11, 1861, to March 3, 1863; declined a renomination; again engaged in the practice of law; nominated by Governor Bullock for chief justice of the supreme court of Massachusetts in 1868, but the nomination was not confirmed by the council; died at his home in Beverly Farms, Mass., September 27, 1878; interment in Forrest Hill Cemetery, Boston, Mass. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/T000157] Massachusetts Delegation (This negotiation)
Charles R. Train Visualize (October 18, 1817 — July 28, 1885) Charles Russell Train, a Representative from Massachusetts; born in Framingham, Mass., October 18, 1817; attended the common schools, Framingham Academy, and was graduated from Brown University, Providence, R.I., in 1837; studied law at Harvard University; was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Framingham, Mass., in 1841; member of the State house of representatives in 1847 and 1848; district attorney 1848-1854; declined the appointment of Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States in 1852; delegate to the State constitutional convention in 1853; delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1856 and 1864; member of the Governor's council in 1857 and 1858; elected as Republican to the Thirty-sixth and Thirty-seventh Congresses (March 4, 1859-March 3, 1863); chairman, Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds (Thirty-sixth and Thirty-seventh Congresses); was not a candidate for renomination in 1862; one of the managers appointed by the House of Representatives in 1862 to conduct the impeachment proceedings against West H. Humphreys, United States judge for the several districts of Tennessee; during the Civil War served in the Union Army as a volunteer aide-de-camp to General McClellan; moved to Boston, Mass.; again served in the State house of representatives 1868-1871; attorney general of Massachusetts 1871-1878; resumed the practice of law; died while on a visit in Conway, Carroll County, N.H., July 28, 1885; interment in Edgell Grove Cemetery, Framingham, Mass. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/T000352] Massachusetts Delegation (This negotiation)
Henry Wilson Visualize (16 February, 1812 -- 22 November, 1875) Wilson was an American shoemaker and politician who was Vice President of the United States from 1873 to 1875. Born "Jeremiah Jones Colbath" in Farmington, N.H., Wilson had his name legally changed in 1833 and moved to Massachusetts to work in the shoe-making trade. Wilson was a delegate to the State constitutional convention in 1853 and was elected on January 31, 1855 to the United States Senate by a coalition of Free Soilers, Americans, Conscience Whigs, and Democrats to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Edward Everett, and soon after aligned with new Republican party. Wilson was reelected in 1859, 1865, and 1871, serving from January 31st, 1855 to March 3rd, 1873. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774- Present', available at http://bioguide.congress.gov/biosearch/biosearch.asp] Massachusetts Delegation (United States Thirteenth Amendment 1863-65) , Massachusetts Delegation (United States Fifteenth Amendment) , Massachusetts Delegation (This negotiation) , Massachusetts Delegation (United States Fourteenth Amendment & The Civil Rights Act of 1866)