Tennessee Delegation

This is one of the 45 delegations in the convention, accounting for 13 of 449 people who took part.

Members (13):

Name Visualize Details Delegations
William T. Avery Visualize (November 11, 1819 — May 22, 1880) William Tecumseh Avery, a Representative from Tennessee; born in Hardeman County, Tenn., November 11, 1819; attended the common schools and was graduated from old Jackson College near Columbia, Maury County, Tenn.; studied law; was admitted to the bar; moved to Memphis, Tenn., in 1840 and engaged in the practice of law; member of the State house of representatives in 1843; elected as a Democrat to the Thirty-fifth and Thirty-sixth Congresses (March 4, 1857-March 3, 1861); was not a candidate for renomination in 1860; during the Civil War served as lieutenant colonel in the Confederate Army; clerk of the criminal court of Shelby County 1870-1874; resumed the practice of law in Memphis, Tenn.; accidentally drowned in Ten Mile Bayou, Crittenden County, Ark., opposite Memphis, Tenn., May 22, 1880; interment in Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/A000347] Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
Reese B. Brabson Visualize (September 16, 1817 — August 16, 1863) Reese Bowen Brabson, (uncle of Charles Keith Bell), a Representative from Tennessee; born at Brabsons Ferry, near Knoxville, Tenn., September 16, 1817; attended the Dandridge Academy, Dandridge, Tenn.; was graduated from Maryville College, Maryville, Tenn., in 1840; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1848 and commenced practice in Chattanooga, Tenn.; also engaged in agricultural pursuits; member of the State house of representatives in 1851 and 1852; elected as a candidate of the Opposition Party to the Thirty-sixth Congress (March 4, 1859-March 3, 1861); was not a candidate for renomination in 1860; engaged in the practice of his profession until his death in Chattanooga, Tenn., August 16, 1863; interment in the Citizens Cemetery. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/B000730] Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
Andrew J. Clements Visualize (December 23, 1832 — November 7, 1913) Andrew Jackson Clements, a Representative from Tennessee; born in Clementsville, Clay County, Tenn., December 23, 1832; attended a private school and Burritt College, Sparta, Tenn.; studied medicine and commenced practice in Lafayette, Tenn.; during the Civil War served as surgeon with the First Regiment, Tennessee Mounted Volunteer Infantry; elected as a Unionist to the Thirty-seventh Congress (March 4, 1861-March 3, 1863); member of the State house of representatives, 1866-1867; resumed the practice of his profession; established a school on his estate for the people of that section of the Cumberland highlands; died in Glasgow, Barren County, Ky., November 7, 1913; interment in Glasgow Cemetery. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/C000505] Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
Emerson Etheridge Visualize Clerk of the House of Representatives during the 37th United States Congress. (September 18, 1819 — October 21, 1902) Emerson Etheridge, a Representative from Tennessee; born in Currituck, Currituck County, N.C., September 18, 1819; moved with his parents to Tennessee in 1831; completed preparatory studies; studied law, admitted to the bar in 1840, and commenced practice in Dresden, Tenn.; member of the Tennessee state house of representatives, 1845-1847; elected as a Whig to the Thirty-third Congress and as the candidate of the American Party to the Thirty-fourth Congress (March 4, 1853-March 3, 1857); unsuccessful candidate for reelection to the Thirty-fifth Congress in 1856; elected as a candidate of the Opposition Party to the Thirty-sixth Congress (March 4, 1859-March 3, 1861); chair, Committee on Indian Affairs (Thirty-sixth Congress); elected Clerk of the United States House of Representatives to the Thirty-seventh Congress (July 4, 1861-December 8, 1863); member of the Tennessee state senate, 1869-1870; unsuccessful candidate for governor of Tennessee in 1867; surveyor of customs in Memphis, Tenn., 1891-1894; died on October 21, 1902, in Dresden, Tenn.; interment in Mount Vernon Cemetery, near Sharon, Tenn. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/E000227] Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation) , Officers of the House of Representatives (United States Thirteenth Amendment 1863-65)
Robert Hatton Visualize (November 2, 1826 — May 31, 1862) Robert Hopkins Hatton, a Representative from Tennessee; born in Steubenville, Jefferson County, Ohio, November 2, 1826; attended the common schools and was graduated from the Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tenn., in 1847; was a tutor in Cumberland University in 1847 and 1848; attended the law school of Cumberland University in 1848 and 1849; principal of Woodland Academy, Sumner County, Tenn., in 1849 and 1850; was admitted to the bar in 1850 and commenced practice in Lebanon, Tenn.; trustee of Cumberland University from 1854 until his death; member of the State house of representatives 1855-1857; unsuccessful candidate for Governor in 1857; elected as an Opposition Party candidate to the Thirty-sixth Congress (March 4, 1859-March 3, 1861); chairman, Committee on Expenditures in the Department of the Navy (Thirty-sixth Congress); colonel of the Seventh Regiment, Tennessee Volunteer Infantry, May 26, 1861; made brigadier general in the Confederate Army May 23, 1862; assigned to the command of the Fifth Brigade, First Corps, Army of Virginia; killed in the Battle of Seven Pines, near Richmond, Va., on May 31, 1862, interment in Cedar Grove Cemetery, Lebanon, Tenn. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/H000349] Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
Andrew Johnson Visualize (December 29, 1808 — July 31, 1875) Andrew Johnson, (father-in-law of David Trotter Patterson), a Representative and a Senator from Tennessee and a Vice President and 17th President of the United States; born in Raleigh, N.C., on December 29, 1808; self-educated; at the age of 13 was apprenticed to a tailor; moved to Tennessee in 1826; employed as a tailor; alderman of Greeneville, Tenn., 1828-1830; mayor of Greeneville 1834-1838; member, State house of representatives 1835-1837, 1839-1841; elected to the State senate in 1841; elected as a Democrat to the Twenty-eighth and to the four succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1843-March 3, 1853); chairman, Committee on Public Expenditures (Thirty-first and Thirty-second Congresses); did not seek renomination, having become a gubernatorial candidate; Governor of Tennessee 1853-1857; elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate and served from October 8, 1857, to March 4, 1862, when he resigned; chairman, Committee to Audit and Control the Contingent Expenses (Thirty-sixth Congress), Committee on the District of Columbia (Thirty-sixth Congress); appointed by President Abraham Lincoln Military Governor of Tennessee in 1862; elected Vice President of the United States on the Republican ticket with Abraham Lincoln in 1864 and was inaugurated on March 4, 1865; became President of the United States on April 15, 1865, upon the death of Abraham Lincoln; wide differences arising between the President and the Congress, a resolution for his impeachment passed the House of Representatives on February 24, 1868; eleven articles were set out in the resolution and the trial before the Senate lasted three months, at the conclusion of which he was acquitted (May 26, 1868) by a vote of thirty-five for conviction to nineteen for acquittal, the necessary two-thirds vote for impeachment not having been obtained; retired to his home in Tennessee upon the expiration of the presidential term, March 3, 1869; unsuccessful candidate for election to the United States Senate in 1869 and to the House of Representatives in 1872; elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1875, until his death near Elizabethton, Carter County, Tenn., July 31, 1875; interment in the Andrew Johnson National Cemetery, Greeneville, Greene County, Tenn. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/J000116] Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
Horace Maynard Visualize "(August 30, 1814 -- May 3, 1882) Horace Maynard was a(n) teacher, lawyer, publican servant, minister, Postmaster General, and American politician. Maynard was born in Westboro, Worcester County, Massachusetts and moved to Tennessee. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1844. He was a presidential elector on the Whig ticket and Republican ticket in 1852 and 1864, attorney general of Tennessee (1863-1865), delegate to the Southern Loyalist Convention at Philadelphia (1866), unsuccessful Republican candidate for Governor of Tennessee (1874), Minister to Turkey (March 9, 1875 - May 1880), and was appointed Postmaster General in the Cabinet of President Hayes (June 2, 1880 - March 5, 1881). He was not elected as a Whig to the 33rd Congress in 1853. Maynard was elected as an American Party candidate, Opposition Party candidate, and Unionist in the 35th, 36th, and 37th Congresses respectively (March 4, 1857 - March 3, 1863). He was elected as a Unconditional Unionist to the 39th Congress and as a Republican to the 40th, 41st, 42nd, 43rd Congresses and was not reelected in 1874 (July 24, 1866 - March 3, 1875). During his time on Congress he served as chairmen on the Committee on Banking and Currency (43rd Congress). [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress 1774 - Present', available at https://bioguideretro.congress.gov/Home/MemberDetails?memIndex=M000284]" Tennessee Delegation (United States Fifteenth Amendment) , Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation) , Tennessee Delegation (United States Fourteenth Amendment & The Civil Rights Act of 1866)
Thomas A. R. Nelson Visualize (March 19, 1812 — August 24, 1873) Thomas Amos Rogers Nelson, a Representative from Tennessee; born in Kingston, Roane County, Tenn., March 19, 1812; completed preparatory studies and was graduated from East Tennessee College in 1828; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1832 and commenced practice in Washington County, Tenn.; served two terms as attorney general of the first judicial circuit; appointed commissioner (diplomatic) to China March 6, 1851, and resigned July 2, 1851; elected as an Opposition Party candidate to the Thirty-sixth Congress (March 4, 1859-March 3, 1861); reelected as an Unionist to the Thirty-seventh Congress, and while en route to Washington to take his seat, during the Civil War, was arrested by Confederate scouts, conveyed to Richmond as a prisoner, paroled, and allowed to return to his home; upon the arrival of the Union Army in East Tennessee in 1863 he moved to Knoxville; delegate to the Union National Convention at Philadelphia in 1866 and to the Democratic National Convention in 1868; one of the counsel who defended President Andrew Johnson in his impeachment trial in 1868; elected judge of the state supreme court in 1870 and served until his resignation in 1871; died in Knoxville, Tenn., August 24, 1873; interment in Gray Cemetery. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/N000042] Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
Alfred O.P. Nicholson Visualize (August 31, 1808 — March 23, 1876) Alfred Osborn Pope Nicholson, a Senator from Tennessee; born near Franklin, Williamson County, Tenn., August 31, 1808; attended the rural schools; graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1827; studied law; admitted to the bar in 1831 and commenced practice in Columbia, Tenn.; edited the Western Mercury in Columbia 1832-1835; member, State house of representatives 1833-1839; appointed as a Democrat to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Felix Grundy and served from December 25, 1840, to February 7, 1842; member, State senate 1843-1845; moved to Nashville, Tenn., and edited the Nashville Union 1844-1846; a director and subsequently president of the Bank of Tennessee in 1846 and 1847; declined an appointment to the Cabinet of President Franklin Pierce in 1853; edited the Washington Union 1853-1856; public printer of the United States House of Representatives; again elected to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1859, until March 3, 1861, when he withdrew; expelled from the Senate on July 11, 1861, for support of the rebellion; chairman, Committee on Revolutionary Claims (Thirty-sixth Congress); chief justice of the supreme court of Tennessee 1870-1876; died in Columbia, Maury County, Tenn., March 23, 1876; interment in Rose Hill Cemetery. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/N000096] Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
James M. Quarles Visualize (February 8, 1823 — March 3, 1901) James Minor Quarles, a Representative from Tennessee; born near Louisa Court House, Louisa County, Va., February 8, 1823; attended the common schools; in 1833 moved to Kentucky with his father who settled in Christian County; completed preparatory studies; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1845 and commenced practice in Clarksville, Tenn.; elected attorney general for the tenth judicial circuit in 1853 and served until 1859, when he resigned, having been elected to Congress; elected as an Opposition Party candidate to the Thirty-sixth Congress (March 4, 1859-March 3, 1861); resumed the practice of law; during the Civil War served in the Confederate Army in the brigade of his brother, Brig. Gen. W.A. Quarles, until the close of the war; moved to Nashville, Tenn., in 1872 and continued the practice of law; elected judge of the criminal court in 1878 and served until 1882, when he resigned; resumed the practice of law; died in Nashville, Tenn., March 3, 1901; interment in Mount Olivet Cemetery. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/Q000002] Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
William B. Stokes Visualize "(September 9, 1814 -- March 14, 1897) William Brickly Stokes was a(n) farmer, public servant, supervisor, soldier, lawyer, and American politician. Stokes was born in Chatham County, North Carolina and moved to Tennessee. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1867. He was a member of the State house of representatives (1849 - 1852), State senate (1855 and 1856), and was a supervisor of internal revenue for Tennessee. He entered the Union Army (May 15, 1862) as a major of Tennessee Volunteers, was promoted to colonel and then major general until he was honorably discharged (March 10 , 1865). He was elected as an Opposition Party to the 36th Congress (March 4, March 3, 1861). Stokes was also elected as an Unconditional Unionist to the 39th and as a Republican to the 40th and 41st Congresses (July 24, 1866 - March 3, 1871), was not elected to the 42nd Congress. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress 1774 - Present', available at https://bioguideretro.congress.gov/Home/MemberDetails?memIndex=S000950]" Tennessee Delegation (United States Fifteenth Amendment) , Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation) , Tennessee Delegation (United States Fourteenth Amendment & The Civil Rights Act of 1866)
James H. Thomas Visualize (September 22, 1808 — August 4, 1876) James Houston Thomas, a Representative from Tennessee; born in Iredell County, N.C., September 22, 1808; attended the rural schools; was graduated from Jackson College, Columbia Tenn., in 1830; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1831 and commenced practice in Columbia, Tenn.; attorney general of Tennessee 1836-1842; elected as a Democrat to the Thirtieth and Thirty-first Congresses (March 4, 1847-March 3, 1851); unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1850 to the Thirty-second Congress; elected to the Thirty-sixth Congress (March 4, 1859-March 3, 1861); resumed the practice of law in Columbia, Tenn.; died near Fayetteville, Lincoln County, Tenn., on August 4, 1876; interment in St. John's Cemetery, Ashwood, Maury County, Tenn. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/T000170] Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
John V. Wright Visualize (June 28, 1828 — June 11, 1908) John Vines Wright, a Representative from Tennessee; born in Purdy, McNairy County, Tenn., June 28, 1828; completed preparatory studies; attended the University of Tennessee at Knoxville, where he pursued courses in medicine and law, graduating from the law department; was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Purdy, Tenn.; elected as a Democrat to the Thirty-fourth, Thirty-fifth, and Thirty-sixth Congresses (March 4, 1855-March 3, 1861); during the Civil War served in the Confederate Army as colonel of the Thirteenth Regiment, Tennessee Infantry, in 1861; elected to the First and Second Confederate Congresses; judge of the circuit court of Tennessee; chancellor and judge of the State supreme court; practiced law in Nashville, Tenn., 1865-1886; unsuccessful candidate as an Anti-Repudiation Democrat for Governor of Tennessee in 1880; was chairman of the Northwest Indian Commission in 1886 and member of the commission to treat with the Great Sioux Nation in Dakota; appointed to the law division of the General Land Office in 1887 and served until his death in Washington, D.C., June 11, 1908; interment in Rock Creek Cemetery. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/W000765] Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)