Missouri Delegation

This is one of the 50 delegations in the convention, accounting for 28 of 713 people who took part.

Members (28):

Name Visualize Details Delegations
Joel F. Asper Visualize (April 20, 1822 — October 1, 1872) Asper was a lawyer, judge, and politician. Joel Funk Asper was born in Adams County, Pennsylvania, moved to Ohio with his parents, and ended up in Missouri in 1864. He graduated from a local college in Warren, Ohio and was admitted to the bar in 1844. Asper served as a justice of the peace in 1846, and as a prosecuting attorney of Geauga County in 1847. In 1850, he moved to Iowa and was the published of the Chardon Democrat. During the Civil War, he enlisted in the Union Army and served as a captain and lieutenant colonel. Asper left the army in 1863 due to wounds sustained in battle. After moving to Missouri in 1864, Asper served as a delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1868. He was elected as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1869 to March 3, 1871. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/A000320] Missouri Delegation (This negotiation)
John F. Benjamin Visualize "(January 23, 1817 -- March 8, 1877) John Forbes Benjamin was a lawyer, public servant, soldier, provost marshal, banker, and American politician. Benjamin was born in Cicero, Onondaga, New York and moved to Missouri in 1848. John studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1848. He was a member of the State house of representatives (1850-1852), presidential elector on the Democratic Ticket in 1856, and was a delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1864. He entered into the Union Army as a private in 1861 and was promoted to the ranks of captain, major, lieutenant colonel, and brigadier general. He was also a provost marshal of the Eighth district of Missouri in 1863 and 1864. Benjamin was elected as a Republican to the 39th, 40th, and 41st Congresses where he served as a chairman on the Committee on Invalid Pensions (41st Congress). He was unsuccessful for reelection in 1870 and 1872. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress 1774 - Present', available at https://bioguideretro.congress.gov/Home/MemberDetails?memIndex=B000364]" Missouri Delegation (This negotiation) , Missouri Delegation (United States Fourteenth Amendment & The Civil Rights Act of 1866) , Missouri Delegation (United States Fifteenth Amendment)
Francis P. Blair Visualize (19 February, 1821 --8 July, 1875) Blair was an American lawyer, soldier, and politician. Born in Lexington, Ky., Blair studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1842 and commenced practice in St. Louis. After serving as a private in the Mexican War, Blair was a member of the State house of representatives (1852-1856). Blair was elected as a Republican to the Thirty-fifth Congress and Thirty-sixth Congress and resigned in 1860. Afterwards, Blair was elected to the Thirty-seventh Congress and served from March 4th, 1861, until his resignation in July 1862 to become a colonel in the Union Army. After the war, Blair presented credentials as a Member-elect to the Thirty-eighth Congress and served from March 4th, 1863, to June 10th, 1864. Blair was elected for his final term as a Democrat to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Charles D. Drake and served from January 20th, 1871 to March 3rd, 1873. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774- Present', available at http://bioguide.congress.gov/biosearch/biosearch.asp] Missouri Delegation (This negotiation) , Missouri Delegation (The Road to Civil War) , Missouri Delegation (United States Thirteenth Amendment 1863-65)
James G. Blair Visualize (January 1, 1825 — March 1, 1904) Blair was a businessman, lawyer, and politician. James Gorrall Blair was born in Blairville, Kentucky in 1825 and moved to Missouri in 1840. There he worked in agriculture and was elected as a circuit clerk. After serving as circuit clerk from 1848 to 1854, he studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1854. Blair was elected as a Liberal Republican to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1871 to March 3, 1873. Following his service in Congress, Blair returned to Missouri where he continued to practice law and engage in agriculture until his death in 1904. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/B000527] Missouri Delegation (This negotiation)
Richard P. Bland Visualize (August 19, 1835 — June 15, 1899) Bland was a teacher, lawyer, and politician. Richard Parks Bland was born in Hartford, Kentucky in 1835 and moved to Missouri in 1855. He traveled West where he taught school for several years and practiced law. Bland was the treasurer in Carson County, Nevada from 1860 until the State government was organized in 1865, when he moved back to Missouri. He was elected as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1895. After an unsuccessful reelection in 1894, Bland took a break from politics until he was elected again to the Fifty-Fifth and Fifty-Sixth Congresses and served again from March 4, 1897 until his death in 1899. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/B000544] Missouri Delegation (This negotiation)
Lewis V. Bogy Visualize (April 9, 1813 — September 20, 1877) Bogy was a businessman, lawyer, and public servant. Lewis Vital Bogy was born in Ste. Genevieve, Missouri in 1813. There he a attended school and worked as a clerk in a mercantile institution. He studied law and graduated from Transylvania University in Kentucky. Bogy practiced law in St. Louis, Missouri and also served as a member of the board of aldermen in St. Louis, and as a member of the State House of Representatives (1840-1841, 1854-1855). He was elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate and served during the Forty-Third and Forty-Fourth Congresses from March 4, 1873 until his death on September 20, 1877. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/B000595] Missouri Delegation (This negotiation)
Sempronius H. Boyd Visualize (28 May, 1828 -- 22 June, 1894) Boyd was an American soldier, lawyer, and politician. Born Williamson County, Tenn., Boyd moved to Missouri in 1854. Boyd studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1856, afterwards becoming the mayor of Springfield. During the Civil War, Boyd served as a colonel, however, resigned when elected as an Unconditional Unionist to the Thirty-eighth Congress. After serving in various public offices, Boyd was again elected as a Republican to the Forty-first Congress. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774- Present', available at http://bioguide.congress.gov/biosearch/biosearch.asp] Missouri Delegation (This negotiation) , Missouri Delegation (United States Thirteenth Amendment 1863-65)
Aylett H. Buckner Visualize (December 14, 1816 — February 5, 1894) Buckner was a teacher, editor, lawyer, businessman, and politician. Aylett Hawes Buckner was born in Fredericksburg, Virginia in 1816 and moved to Missouri in 1837. Prior to moving to Missouri, he attended Georgetown College and the University of Virginia at Charlottesville. After obtaining an education, Buckner taught school for many years before moving to Missouri. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1838 and practiced law in Bowling Green, Missouri while also acting as editor of the Salt River Journal. Buckner served as a judge of the third judicial circuit in 1857, and was a delegate to a convention in 1861 to prevent the Civil War. Before being elected to Congress, Buckner worked in various industries including mercantiles and tobacco. He was elected as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1885. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/B001031] Missouri Delegation (This negotiation)
Samuel S. Burdett Visualize (February 21, 1836 — September 24, 1914) Burdett was a farmer, lawyer, and politician. Samuel Swinfin Burdett was born in Leicestershire, England and immigrated to the United States at the age of twelve. He and his family settled in Lorain County, Ohio, where he attended school and later studied law and Oberlin College.; Burdett was admitted to the bar in 1859 and practiced law in Iowa. During the Civil War, he enlisted in the Union Army and attained the ranks of lieutenant and captain. After the war, he moved to Missouri and worked as an attorney for the seventh circuit from 1868 to 1869. Burdett was elected as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1869 to March 3, 1873. He died in Leicestershire, England on September 24, 1914. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/B001074] Missouri Delegation (This negotiation)
John B. Clark, Jr. Visualize (January 14, 1831 — September 7, 1903) Clark was an American politician and lawyer. John Bullock Clark, Jr. was born in Howard County, Missouri and later spent two years in California. He graduated from Harvard University in 1854 and was admitted to the bar the following year. During the Civil War, he served in the Confederate Army as a captain, major, colonel, and brigadier general. Clark was elected as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1883. From 1883 to 1889, he was the Clerk of the House of Representatives. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/C000442] Missouri Delegation (This negotiation)
Abram Comingo Visualize (January 9, 1820 — November 10, 1889) Comingo was an American politician and lawyer. Abram Comingo was born in Mercer County, Kentucky in 1820 and moved to Missouri in 1848. He graduated from Centre College and was admitted to the bar in 1847. After moving to Missouri, Comingo served in the Missouri state constitutional convention in 1861, and was appointed provost marshal of the sixth district in 1863. He was elected as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1871 to March 3, 1875. After serving in Congress, Comingo was appointed by the President of the United States to serve on the commission to arbitrate with the Sioux Indians. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/C000658] Missouri Delegation (This negotiation)
Thomas T. Crittenden Visualize (January 1, 1832 — May 29, 1909) Crittenden was an American politician and lawyer. Thomas Theodore Crittenden was born in Shelbyville, Kentucky in 1832 and moved to Missouri in 1858. He graduated from Centre College and was admitted to the bar in 1858. During the Civil War, Crittenden served in the Union Army and attained the rank of captain and later lieutenant colonel. He was elected as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1875. After an unsuccessful campaign for reelection, Crittenden took a break from politics until 1876 when he was again elected to the Forty-Fifth Congress and served from March 4, 1877 to March 3, 1879. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/C000913] Missouri Delegation (This negotiation)
Charles D. Drake Visualize "(April 11, 1811 -- April 1, 1892) Charles Daniel Drake was a(n) lawyer, midshipman, public servant, judge, and American politician. Drake was born in Cincinnati, Ohio and moved to St. Louis in 1834. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1833. He was appointed midshipman in the United States Navy (1825 - 1829), member of the state house of representatives (1859-1860), member of the State constitutional convention (1865), and appointed chief justice of the Court of Claims (1870 - 1885). Charles was elected as a Republican to the United States Senate (March 4, 1867 - December 19, 1870) where he served as chairman on the Committee on Education. He resigned from the Senate to accept a judicial position. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress 1774 - Present', available at https://bioguideretro.congress.gov/Home/MemberDetails?memIndex=D000484]" Missouri Delegation (This negotiation) , Missouri Delegation (United States Fifteenth Amendment)
David P. Dyer Visualize (February 12, 1838 — April 29, 1924) Dyer was an American lawyer and politician. David Patterson Dyer was born in Henry County, Virginia and moved to Missouri in 1841 with his parents. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1859. During the Civil War, Dyer enlisted in the Union Army and attained the ranks of lieutenant colonel and colonel. After serving in the war, he served in the State House of Representatives from 1862 to 1865, and as Secretary of the State Senate in 1866. Dyer was elected as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1869 to March 3, 1871. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/D000589] Missouri Delegation (This negotiation)
Gustavus A. Finkelnburg Visualize (April 6, 1837 — May 18, 1908) Finkelnburg was a judge, lawyer, and public servant. Gustavus Adolphus Finkelnburg was born in Cologne, Germany in 1837 and immigrated to the United States in 1848 with his family. They settled in St. Charles, Missouri, where he later attended college at the St. Charles College. Finkelnburg graduated from the Cincinnati (Ohio) Law School in 1859 and was admitted to the bar the following year. During the Civil War, he served in the Union Army. After the war, Finkelnburg was a member in the State House of Representatives (1864-1868), and served as Speaker pro tempore during his last year in the State House. He was elected as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives for the Forty-First Congress, and was reelected as a Liberal Republican for the Forty-Second Congress. Overall, Finkelnburg served in Congress from March 4, 1869 to March 3, 1873. After his service in Congress, he was appointed to be a judge for the eastern district of Missouri and served from 1905 to 1907. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/F000129] Missouri Delegation (This negotiation)
John M. Glover Visualize (September 4, 1822 — November 15, 1891) Glover was a businessman, lawyer, and politician. John Montgomery Glover was born in Harrodsburg, Kentucky in 1822 and moved to Missouri in 1836. He attended Marion and Masonic Colleges in Philadelphia, Missouri, where he studied law and was admitted to the bar. During the Civil War, Glover served as a colonel in the Missouri Volunteer Calvary from 1861 to 1864, having resigned due to poor health. He was elected as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1879. After serving in Congress, Glover returned to Missouri and engaged in agriculture until his death in 1891. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/G000245] Missouri Delegation (This negotiation)
Robert A. Hatcher Visualize (February 24, 1819 — December 4, 1886) Hatcher was a lawyer and politician. Robert Anthony Hatcher was born in Buckingham County, Virginia and moved to Missouri in 1847. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in Kentucky, but practiced in New Madrid, Missouri. Hatcher served in the State House of Representatives from 1850 to 1851, and later served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. He was a member of the Confederate Congress in 1864 and 1865, before the end of the war. Hatcher was elected as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1879. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/H000341] Missouri Delegation (This negotiation)
Harrison E. Havens Visualize (December 15, 1837 — August 16, 1916) Havens was an American politician, lawyer, editor, and planter. Harrison Eugene Havens was born in Franklin County, Ohio and moved to Missouri in 1867. During the Civil War, he served in the Union Army as a captain in the Iowa Volunteer Infantry. After the war he moved to Springfield, Missouri and became the editor of a newspaper. Havens was elected as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1871 to March 3, 1875. After serving in Congress, he moved to Oklahoma where he continued working in the newspaper business. In 1906, Havens moved to Havana, Cuba and engaged in planting until his death in 1916. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/H000357] Missouri Delegation (This negotiation)
Ira B. Hyde Visualize (January 18, 1838 — December 6, 1926) Hyde was a banker, lawyer, and politician. Ira Barnes Hyde was born in Guilford, New York in 1838 and moved to Ohio at the age of fifteen. He graduated from Oberlin (Ohio) College, studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1861. He enlisted in the Union Army as a private during the Civil War and later participated in the campaigns against the Sioux Indians. Hyde was elected as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1875. After serving in Congress, he returned to Missouri and practiced law as well as worked as a banker until his death in 1926. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/H001023] Missouri Delegation (This negotiation)
Daniel T. Jewett Visualize (September 14, 1807 — October 7, 1906) Jewett was a businessman, lawyer, and politician. Daniel Tarbox Jewett was born in Pittston, Maine in 1807. He graduated from Columbia College and studied law at Harvard Law School. Jewett was admitted to the bar and practiced law in Bangor, Maine. In 1850, he began operating a steamboat line on the Chagres River in the Isthmus of Panama with his brother. After which, he moved to California and worked as a gold miner for two years. Jewett moved to St. Louis, Missouri in 1857 and started his political career. He served in the State House of Representatives before being elected as a Republican to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Charles Drake. He served in the Senate from December 19, 1870 to January 20, 1871. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/J000103] Missouri Delegation (This negotiation)
Andrew King Visualize (March 20, 1812 — November 18, 1895) King was an American politician and lawyer. Andrew King was born in Greenbrier County, Virginia (now West Virginia) in 1812 and moved to Missouri after studying law. While in Missouri, he served as a member of the States Senate (1846) and the State House of Delegates (1858). Before being elected to Congress, King served as a circuit court judge in Missouri from 1859 to 1864. He was elected as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1871 to March 3, 1873. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/K000193] Missouri Delegation (This negotiation)
James M. McCormick Visualize "(August 1, 1824 -- May 19, 1897) James Robinson McCormick was a(n) surgeon, public servant, general, and American politician. He was born near Irondale, Washington County, Missouri. James was a delegate to the state constitutional convention (1861) and served in the state senate (1862 & 1866). He also served in the Union Army as a surgeon in the 6th Regiment, Missouri Volunteer Infantry, Union Army, and was brigadier general of militia in 1863. McCormick was elected as a Republican to the 40th, 41st, and 42nd Congresses (December 17, 1867 - March 3, 1873) and was not reelected in 1872. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress 1774 - Present', available at https://bioguideretro.congress.gov/Home/MemberDetails?memIndex=M000367]" Missouri Delegation (This negotiation) , Missouri Delegation (United States Fifteenth Amendment)
Isaac C. Parker Visualize (October 15, 1838 — November 17, 1896) Parker was a lawyer, judge, and politician. Isaac Charles Parker was born in Barnesville, Ohio in 1838 and moved to. Missouri in 1859. That same year he was admitted to the bar and practiced law in St. Joseph, Missouri. Parker served as the city attorney for St. Joesph from 1862 to 1864, after which he served as a circuit judge until 1870. He was elected as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1871 to March 3, 1875. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at hhttps://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/P000059] Missouri Delegation (This negotiation)
Carl Schurz Visualize (March 2, 1829 — May 14, 1906) Schurz was a newspaper correspondent, teacher, lawyer, and politician. Carl Schurz was born in Liblar, Germany and immigrated to the United States in 1852. Prior to immigrating, he attended the University of Bonn and took part in the German revolutionary movement in 1848. Schurz fled to Paris, where he worked as a newspaper correspondent. Later he taught school in London before moving to the United States. In the United States, Schurz settled in Wisconsin, studied law and was admitted to the bar. During the Civil War he enlisted in the Union Army as a brigadier general. After the war, he worked for a newspaper in St. Louis, Missouri. Schurz was elected as a Republican to the United States Senate undeserved during the Forty-First, Forty-Second, and Forty-Third Congresses from March 4, 1869 to March 3, 1875. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/S000151] Missouri Delegation (This negotiation)
Edwin O. Stanard Visualize (January 5, 1832 — March 12, 1914) Stanard was a teacher, businessman, and politician. Edwin Obed Stanard was born in Newport, New Hampshire in 1832 and moved to Missouri in 1853. He taught school in Illinois from 1854 to 1855 and graduated from St. Louis Commercial College in 1855. He worked in the commission business and eventually in the milling business. Stanard served as Lieutenant Governor of Missouri before being elected to Congress. He was elected as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1875. After his service in Congress, he returned to St. Louis and worked in the manufacturing of flour until he died in 1914. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at hhttps://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/S000787] Missouri Delegation (This negotiation)
William J. Stone Visualize (November 7, 1828 — July 9, 1901) Stone was a businessman and politician. William Henry Stone was born in Shawangunk, New York in 1828 and moved to Missouri in 1848. There he entered the business of iron manufacturing and later became the President of the St. Louis Hot Pressed Nut and Bolt Company in 1867. Stone served as a member of the State House of Representatives and in the St. Louis Board of Water Commissioners until he was elected to Congress in 1873. He was elected as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1877. After an unsuccessful renomination to the Forty-Fifth Congress, Stone continued his business pursuits until his death in 1901. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/S000967] Missouri Delegation (This negotiation)
Robert T. Van Horn Visualize "(May 19, 1824 -- January 3, 1916) Robert Thompson Van Horn was a printer, lawyer, member of a board of aldermen, postmaster, editor, mayor, soldier, collector of internal revenue, and American politician. Van horn was born in East Mahoning, Indiana County, Pennsylvania and moved to Kansas City, Missouri in 1855. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1850. He was a member of the board of aldermen in 1857, was postmaster of Kansas City (1857-1861), and established the Kansas City Journal. He was elected Mayor of Kansas City in 1861 and 1864. He enlisted in the Union Army during the Civil War and served as lieutenant colonel of the 25th Regiment Missouri Volunteer Infantry. He served as a member of the State senate (1862-1864), was chairmen of the Republican State central committee (1874-1876), was a collector of internal revenue for the 6th district of Missouri (1875-1881), was a delegate to the Republican National conventions in 1864, 1868, 1872, 1876, 1880, and 1884, and was part of the Republican National Committee in 1872 and 1884. Van Horn was elected as a Republican to the 39th, 40th, 41st, and 47th Congresses (March 4, 1865 - March 3, 1871 and March 4, 1881 - March 3, 1883), and was not a candidate for renomination in 1870 or 1896. He successfully contested the election of John c. Tarsney to the 54th Congress and served from February 27, 1896 to March 3, 1897. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress 1774 - Present', available at https://bioguideretro.congress.gov/Home/MemberDetails?memIndex=V000042]" Missouri Delegation (This negotiation) , Missouri Delegation (United States Fourteenth Amendment & The Civil Rights Act of 1866) , Missouri Delegation (United States Fifteenth Amendment)
Erastus Wells Visualize (December 2, 1823 — October 2, 1893) Wells was a businessman and politician. Erastus Wells was born in Jefferson County, New York in 1823 and moved to Missouri in 1842. He helped establish the first omnibus line in St. Louis and inaugurated the first street railroad company. Wells was elected as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1869 to March 3, 1877. After serving in Congress, he became President of the Laclede Gas Light Company and served in that capacity from 1880 to 1883. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/W000282] Missouri Delegation (This negotiation)