United States Nineteenth Amendment and Edmunds Tucker Act

The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution secured the right to vote to women.

Samuel S. Cox

Quill platform ID: p7241.

(September 30, 1824 — September 10, 1889) Samuel Sullivan Cox was an American politician and lawyer. Cox was born in Zanesville, Ohio in 1824. He graduated from Brown University in 1846 and he was admitted to the bar in 1849. From 1853 to 1854, Cox was owner and editor of the Columbus Statesman before serving as secretary of the legation in Lima, Peru in 1855. He was first elected to the United States House of Representatives as a Democratic representative from Ohio. He served as an Ohio representative from March 4, 1857 to March 3, 1865. After an unsuccessful candidacy for reelection, Cox moved to New York City where he practiced law. He was again elected to the United States House of Representatives, this time to represent the people of New York. He served from March 4, 1869 to March 3, 1873 and again lost reelection for the Forty-Third Congress. However, he was later elected to fill the vacancy occasioned by the death of James Brooks and he served again from November, 1873 to May, 1885. From 1885 to 1886, he was appointed as an ambassador to Turkey by President Cleveland and left that appointment to served in Congress. Cox was again elected to the House to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Joseph Pulitzer. He served a final time from November 2, 1886 until his death on September 10, 1889. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/C000839]

Member of New York Delegation—United States Nineteenth Amendment and Edmunds Tucker Act.

Resources (0):

Resource Collections (0):

None

Resource Items (0):

None