United States Thirteenth Amendment 1863-65

An amendment to the United States Constitution to abolish slavery introduced during the American Civil War.

New Hampshire Delegation

This is one of the 41 delegations in the convention, accounting for 5 of 265 people who took part.

Members (5):

Name Visualize Details Delegations
Daniel Clark Visualize (24 October, 1809 -- 2 January, 1891) Clark was an American lawyer and politician. Born in Stratham, N.H., Clark studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1837. Clark was a member of the State house of representatives (1842-1843, 1846, 1854-1855) and was elected as a Republican to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the death of James Bell and succeeded in reelection in 1861. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774- Present', available at http://bioguide.congress.gov/biosearch/biosearch.asp] New Hampshire Delegation (The Road to Civil War) , New Hampshire Delegation (This negotiation) , New Hampshire Delegation (United States Fourteenth Amendment & The Civil Rights Act of 1866)
John P. Hale Visualize (31 March, 1806 -- 19 November, 1873) Hale was an American lawyer and politician. Born in Strafford County, N.H., Hale studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1830. Hale was appointed by President Andrew Jackson as United States attorney in 1834, however, was removed by President John Tyler in 1841. Hale was elected as a Democrat to the Twenty-eighth Congress and had his renomination revoked after refusing to vote in favor of the annexation of Texas. Later, Hale was elected as a Free Soil candidate to the United States Senate in 1846 and later in 1855 to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Charles G. Atherton with successful reelection in 1859. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774- Present', available at http://bioguide.congress.gov/biosearch/biosearch.asp] New Hampshire Delegation (The Road to Civil War) , New Hampshire Delegation (This negotiation)
Daniel Marcy Visualize (7 November, 1809 -- 3 November, 1893) Marcy was an American shipbuilder and politician. Born in Portsmouth, N.H., Marcy attended the common schools and worked in shipbuilding. Marcy was a member of the State house of representatives (1854-1857) and the State senate (1857, 1858). Marcy was elected as a Democrat to the Thirty-eighth Congress. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774- Present', available at http://bioguide.congress.gov/biosearch/biosearch.asp] New Hampshire Delegation (This negotiation)
James W. Patterson Visualize (July 2, 1823 -- 4 May, 1893) Patterson was an American professor and politician. Born in Henniker, N.H., Patterson was a professor of mathematics, astronomy, and meteorology at Dartmouth College from 1854 to 1865. Patterson was elected as a Republican to the Thirty-eighth and Thirty-ninth Congresses and was elected to the United States Senate in 1867. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774- Present', available at http://bioguide.congress.gov/biosearch/biosearch.asp] New Hampshire Delegation (This negotiation) , New Hampshire Delegation (United States Fourteenth Amendment & The Civil Rights Act of 1866) , New Hampshire Delegation (United States Fifteenth Amendment)
Edward H. Rollins Visualize (3 October, 1824 -- 31 July, 1889) Rollins was an American businessman and politician. Rollins was born in Strafford County, N.H.. Rollins was a member of the State house of representatives (1855-1857) and was elected as a Republican to the Thirty-seventh, Thirty-eighth, and Thirty-ninth Congresses. In 1876, Rollins was elected as a Republican to the United States Senate. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774- Present', available at http://bioguide.congress.gov/biosearch/biosearch.asp] New Hampshire Delegation (United States Nineteenth Amendment and Edmunds Tucker Act) , New Hampshire Delegation (The Road to Civil War) , New Hampshire Delegation (This negotiation) , New Hampshire Delegation (United States Fourteenth Amendment & The Civil Rights Act of 1866)