United States Nineteenth Amendment and Edmunds Tucker Act

The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution secured the right to vote to women.

Tennessee Delegation

This is one of the 63 delegations in the convention, accounting for 37 of 1451 people who took part.

Members (37):

Name Visualize Details Delegations
John D. C. Atkins Visualize (June 4, 1825 — June 2, 1908) Atkins was a businessman and politician. John De Witt Clinton Atkins was born in Henry County, Tennessee in 1825. He graduated from East Tennessee University at Knoxville in 1845, after which he studied law and was admitted to the bar. However, Atkins did not practice law, rather, he entered the agriculture business. He served in the State House of Representatives from 1849 to 1851, and in the State Senate from 1855 to 1857. Atkins served in the United States House of Representatives for the first time from March 4, 1857 to 1859. During the Civil War, he enlisted in the the Confederate Army and attained the rank of lieutenant colonel. He was also elected to the Confederate Provisional Congress in 1861 and served until 1863. After the war, Aktins was again elected as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1883. After serving in Congress, he returned to Tennessee and continued working in agriculture. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/A000327] Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
Richard W. Austin Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
James E. Bailey Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
J. G. Ballentine Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
John M. Bright Visualize (January 20, 1817 — October 3, 1911) Bright was an American politician and lawyer. John Morgan Bright was born in Fayetteville, Tennessee in 1817. He graduated from Nashville (Tennessee) University in 1839 and from the law department of Transylvania University, in Kentucky, in 1841. Bright was admitted to the bar in 1841 and practiced law in Fayetteville, Tennessee. He served as a member of the State House of Representatives and also as a general on the staff of the Governor of Tennessee from 1861 to 1865. Bright was elected as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1871 to March 3, 1881. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/B000836] Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
Joseph W. Byrns Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
A. J. Caldwell Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
William P. Caldwell Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
Edwin L. Davis Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
George D. Dibrell Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
Hubert Fisher Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
Finis J. Garrett Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
P. T. Glass Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
Isham G. Harris Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
L. C. Houk Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
John F. House Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
William C. Houston Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
Cordell Hull Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
Howell E. Jackson Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
Kenneth D. McKellar Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
Benton McMillin Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
John Austin Moon Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
John R. Neal Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
Lemuel Phillips Padgett Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
A. H. Pettibone Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
James H. Randolph Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
James D. Richardson Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
Haywood Y. Riddle Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
Sam R. Sells Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
John K. Shields Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
Thetus Willrette Sims Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
J. Will Taylor Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
John M. Taylor Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
Zach Taylor Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
Jacob M. Thornburgh Visualize (July 3, 1837 — September 19, 1890) Thornburgh was an American politician and lawyer. Jacob Montgomery Thornburgh was born in Jefferson County, Tennessee in 1837. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1861. He enlisted in the Union Army during the Civil War and served as a private and lieutenant colonel. After the war, he returned to Tennessee and was appointed attorney general of the third judicial circuit of Tennessee from 1866 to 1870. Thornburgh was elected as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1879. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/T000239] Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
Washington C. Whitthorne Visualize (April 19, 1825 — September 21, 1891) Whitthorne was an American politician and lawyer. Washington Curran Whitthorne was born in Farmington, Tennessee in 1825. He graduated from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville in 1843. After that, he studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1845. While practicing law in Columbia, Tennessee, Whitthorne also served as auditor’s clerk in 1848, as a member of the State House of Representatives, and as a member of the State Senate. During the Civil War, he enlisted in the Confederate Army and attained the rank of assistant adjutant general and adjutant general. Whitthorne was elected as a Democrat to the both the United States House of Representatives and the Senate. He served as a Representative from March 4, 1871 to March 3, 1883 and in the Senate from April 16, 1886 to March 3, 1891, after filling the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Howell Jackson. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/W000429] Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)
H. Casey Young Visualize None Tennessee Delegation (This negotiation)