United States Nineteenth Amendment and Edmunds Tucker Act

The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution secured the right to vote to women.

North Carolina Delegation

This is one of the 63 delegations in the convention, accounting for 36 of 1451 people who took part.

Members (36):

Name Visualize Details Delegations
Risden T. Bennett Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
Samuel M. Brinson Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
James Jefferson Britt Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
Curtis H. Brogden Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
William H. H. Cowles Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
William R. Cox Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
Joseph J. Davis Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
Robert L. Doughton Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
Hannibal L. Godwin Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
Hannibal L. Goodwin Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
Wharton J. Green Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
John S. Henderson Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
John S. Henderson Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
George E. Hood Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
Thomas D. Johnston Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
Claude Kitchin Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
Augustus S. Merrimon Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
James E. O'Hara Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
Lee S. Overman Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
Edward W. Pou Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
Matt W. Ransom Visualize (October 8, 1826 — October 8, 1904) Ransom was a businessman, lawyer, and politician. Matt Whitaker Ransom was born in Warren County, North Carolina. He graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1847, after which he studied law and was admitted to the bar. Ransom served as a member of the State House of Commons and as the attorney general of North Carolina. During the Civil War, he enlisted in the Confederate Army and attained the rank of major general. After the war Ransom moved to Weldon, North Carolina and became a planter as well as practiced law. He was elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy in the Senate at the start of the congressional session. He served in the Senate from January 30, 1872 until March 3, 1895. After serving in Congress, Ransom worked in the agriculture business until his death in 1904. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/R000062] North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
James W. Reid Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
William M. Robbins Visualize (October 26, 1828 — May 5, 1905) Robbins was an American politician and lawyer. William McKendree Robbins was born in Trinity, North Carolina in 1828. He attended Trinity College and graduated from Randolph-Macon College in Virginia. Robbins studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1854. After being admitted to the bar, he moved to Alabama and practiced law in Eufaula. During the Civil War, Ransom served in the Confederate Army for four years and attained the rank of major. After the war, he served in the State Senate from 1868 to 1872, before being elected as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives. He served in Congress from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1879. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/R000302] North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
Leonidas D. Robinson Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
Alfred M. Scales Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
Furnifold M. Simmons Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
Thomas G. Skinner Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
John Humphrey Small Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
Charles M. Stedman Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
Walter L. Steele Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
Robert B. Vance Visualize (April 24, 1828 — November 28, 1899) Vance was a businessman, court clerk, and politician. Robert Frank Vance was born in Reems Creek, North Carolina in 1828. After receiving an education at the common schools, he worked in the mercantile business and in agriculture. During the Civil War, Vance enlisted in the Confederate Army and was elected as a captain, colonel, and appointed as a brigadier general. He was elected as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives and served for six congressional sessions from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1885. After serving in Congress, he returned to Alexander, North Carolina and served in the State House of Representatives from 1894 to 1896. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/V000019] North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
Zebulon B. Vance Visualize (May 13, 1830 — April 14, 1894) Zebulon Baird Vance, (nephew of Robert Brank Vance, brother of Robert Brank Vance), a Representative and a Senator from North Carolina; born on Reems Creek, near Asheville, Buncombe County, N.C., May 13, 1830; attended the common schools of Buncombe County, and Washington (Tenn.) College; studied law at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; admitted to the bar in 1852 and commenced practice in Asheville, N.C.; elected prosecuting attorney of Buncombe County in 1852; member, State house of commons 1854; elected as a Democrat to the Thirty-fifth Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Thomas L. Clingman; reelected to the Thirty-sixth Congress and served from December 7, 1858, to March 3, 1861; during the Civil War entered the Confederate Army as a captain and was promoted to the rank of colonel; elected Governor of North Carolina in 1862, and reelected in 1864; removed from office in 1865 when he was arrested and imprisoned in Washington, D.C. for Confederate activities; elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate in November 1870, but did not present his credentials; unsuccessful Democratic candidate for election to the United States Senate in 1872; Governor of North Carolina 1876-1878; elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate in 1879; reelected in 1884 and 1890, and served from March 4, 1879, until his death; chairman, Committee on Enrolled Bills (Forty-sixth Congress), Committee on Privileges and Elections (Fifty-third Congress); died in Washington, D.C., April 14, 1894; funeral services were held in the Chamber of the United States Senate; interment in Riverside Cemetery, Asheville, N.C. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/V000021] North Carolina Delegation (The Road to Civil War) , North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
Alfred M. Waddell Visualize (September 16 ,1834 — March 17, 1912) Waddell was a businessman, politician, and lawyer. Alfred Moore Waddell was born in Hillsboro, North Carolina in 1834. He graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1853. After that, he studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1855. Waddell was clerk of the court of equity from 1858 to 1861 and served as a delegate to the Constitutional Union National Convention in 1860. Waddell also worked in newspaper, editing the Wilmington Daily Herald from 1860 to 1861. During the Civil War, he served as a lieutenant colonel in the Confederate Army. Waddell was elected as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1871 to March 3, 1879. After serving in Congress, he continued to practice law and work in the literary business. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/W000002] North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
Zebulon Weaver Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
Edwin Y. Webb Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)
Jesse J. Yeates Visualize None North Carolina Delegation (This negotiation)