United States Nineteenth Amendment and Edmunds Tucker Act

The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution secured the right to vote to women.

Georgia Delegation

This is one of the 63 delegations in the convention, accounting for 39 of 1451 people who took part.

Members (39):

Name Visualize Details Delegations
George T. Barnes Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
Hiram P. Bell Visualize (January 19, 1827 — August 17, 1907) Hiram Parks Bell was a teacher, lawyer, and politician. Bell was born in Jefferson, Georgia in 1827. He taught school while studying law and was admitted to the bar in 1849. Bell was a member of the secession convention in 1861 and was one of the members that opposed the secession ordinance drafted by the convention. He served in the State Senate in 1861, and resigned at the beginning of the Civil War to enlist in the Confederate Army. He was commissioned captain and later attained the ranks of lieutenant colonel and colonel. Near the end of the war, Bell served in the Second Confederate Congress. He was elected as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1875. He served a second time in Congress when he was elected to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Benjamin Hill. His service lasted from March 13, 1877 to March 3, 1879. Following his service in Congress, Bell served in the State House of Representatives (1898-1899) and in the State Senate (1900-1901). [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/B000336] Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
Thomas Montgomery Bell Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
James H. Blount Visualize (September 12, 1837 — March 8, 1903) James Henderson Blount was an American lawyer and politician. Blount was born in Clinton, George in 1837. He graduated from the University of Georgia at Athens in 1858. He then studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1859. During the Civil War he enlisted in the Confederate Army and served as a private and lieutenant colonel. Blount was a delegate to the State constitutional convention before being elected to Congress. He was elected as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1893. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/B000568] Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
Charles H. Brand Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
Joseph E. Brown Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
Allen D. Candler Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
Milton A. Candler Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
Judson C. Clements Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
Alfred H. Colquitt Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
Philip Cook Visualize (July 30, 1817 — May 24, 1894) Philip Cook was an American politician and lawyer. Cook was born in Twiggs County, Georgia in 1817. He graduated from Oglethorpe University and studied law at University of Virginia. Cook was admitted to the bar and practiced law in Forsyth, Georgia. He served in the State Senate in 1859 and 1860, before joining the Confederate Army. After the Civil War, he served again in the State Senate in 1863 and 1864. Cook was elected as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1883. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/C000724] Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
Charles F. Crisp Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
Charles R. Crisp Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
William H. Felton Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
William B. Fleming Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
John B. Gordon Visualize (February 6, 1832 — January 9, 1904) John Brown Gordon was a coal miner, lawyer, and politician. Gordon was born in Upson County, Georgia in 1832. He attended the University of Georgia at Athens, and was admitted to the bar in 1853. Rather than practice law, Gordon worked in coal mining until the start of the Civil War. He enlisted in the Confederate Army and served as a captain and Lieutenant General. Gordon was elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate and served during the Forty-Third, Forty-Fourth, Forty-Fifth, and start of the Forty-Sixth Congresses. He served in Congress from March 4, 1873 to May 26, 1880, when he resigned to pursue interests in the railroad industry. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/G000313] Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
N. J. Hammond Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
Thomas W. Hardwick Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
Henry R. Harris Visualize (February 2, 1828 — October 15, 1909) Henry Richard Harris was a businessman and politician. Harris was born in Sparta, Georgia in 1828. He graduated from Emory College in 1847 and began his career in politics. Harris served as a member to the State constitutional convention in 1861, before enlisting in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. After the war, he was elected as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1879. He wasn’t reelected for the Forty-Sixth Congress in 1878, but was elected again for the Forty-Ninth Congress and served a second time in the House from March 4, 1885 to March 3, 1887. After serving in Congress and as the Third Assistant Postmaster General of the United States from 1887 to 1889, Harris worked in agriculture until his death in 1909. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/H000239] Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
William J. Harris Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
Julian Hartridge Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
Benjamin H. Hill Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
William S. Howard Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
William C. Lankford Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
William W. Larsen Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
Gordon Lee Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
Thomas M. Norwood Visualize (April 26, 1830 — June 19, 1913) Thomas Manson Norwood was a lawyer, judge, and politician. Norwood was born in Talbot County, Georgia in 1830. He graduated from Emory College, studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1852. Norwood served in the State House of Representatives (1861-1862), and was a presidential elector in 1868. He was elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate and served during the Forty-Second, Forty-Third, and Forty-Fourth Congresses from 1871 to 1877. He was again elected to Congress, this time to the United States House of Representatives, and served from March 4, 1885 to March 3, 1889. After his service in Congress, Norwood was a judge of the city court in Savannah from 1896 to 1908. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/N000160] Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
James W. Overstreet Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
Frank Park Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
Seaborn Reese Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
Hoke Smith Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
William E. Smith Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
Alexander H. Stephens Visualize (February 11, 1812 — March 4, 1883) Alexander Hamilton Stephens was a teacher, lawyer, and politician. Stephens was born in Crawfordville, Georgia in 1812. He graduated from the University of Georgia in 1832. After teaching school for a time, Stephens studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1834. He served in the State House of Representatives (1836-1841) and in the State Senate (1842). Stephens was elected as a Whig to the United States House of Representatives and served during the Twenty-Eighth through the Thirty-First Congresses. He then ran as a Unionist and was elected to the Thirty-Second Congress, and served during the three succeeding Congresses as a Whig. During the Civil War, Stephens served in the Confederate Congress and was chosen by the Confederate Congress to act as Vice President of the provisional government. After the war, he was elected again to the United States House of Representatives, this time as a Democrat, to fill the vacancy occasioned by the death of Ambrose Wright. He served from December 1, 1873 to November 4, 1882, when he resigned, having been elected Governor of Georgia. He served in that capacity until his death in 1883. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/S000854] Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
Henry G. Turner Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
William D. Upshaw Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
Carl Vinson Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
John R. Walker Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
James W. Wise Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)
William C. Wright Visualize None Georgia Delegation (This negotiation)